05. oktober 2018

What is 'Good Doctoring' When Antibiotic Resistance is a Global Threat?

Associate Professor of Sociology Inge Kryger Pedersen is together with PhD fellow Kim Sune Karrasch Jepsen the author of two chapters in the newly published book Risking Antimicrobial Resistance: A collection of one-health studies of antibiotics and its social and health consequences.

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR) is predicted to be one of the greatest threats to public health in the twenty-first century. In this context, understanding the reasons why perceptions of antibiotic risk differ between different groups is crucial when it comes to tackling antibiotic misuse. The book examines the social factors that affect use of antibiotics among humans and animals with a unique focus on Denmark – one of the world’s most progressive countries when it comes to antibiotic regulation – as well as Europe more broadly.

Their chapter 'What is 'Good Doctoring' When Antibiotic Resistance is a Global Threat?' lays out results from an exploratory enquiry into 'good doctoring' in the case of antibiotic prescriptions and explores the changing jurisdictions of doctors and the transformative mechanism that enable change to occur in clinical practice.

In their other chapter 'The Antibiotic Challenge: Justifications for Antibiotic Usage in the World of Medicine' the two authors explore the following question: By what means do medical professionals practicing within a certain expert culture justify the usage of antibiotics?

Inge Kryger Pedersen & Kim Sune Karrasch Jepsen, What is 'Good Doctoring' When Antibiotic Resistance is a Global Threat? & The Antibiotic Challenge: Justifications for Antibiotic Usage in the World of Medicine, Palgrave Macmillan, 2019.